Lawyer for Fox News accusers says Sky deal must be blocked

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Ofcom, Britain's telecommunications regulator, is now reviewing the proposed deal to determine whether it is in the public interest.

But Profusek said: "I think more relevant than the harassment cases is the fact that Fox already owns 39 percent of Sky, so the idea of blocking them at this point doesn't make much sense".

Wigdor's testimony will follow an appearance by Wendy Walsh, the radio psychologist who went public with her harassment complaint against Fox News.

Rupert Murdoch, second from left, leaves a restaurant with Fox News co-presidents Jack Abernethy, second from right, and Bill Shine, right, last month in NY.

Former Fox news anchor Bill O'Reilly and the network's chief executive Roger Ailes have both left the company, following allegations of sexual and racial harassment, which they deny. However, Murdoch has a point about the network's ratings as FNC finished April as the most-watched channel in all of cable.

Murdoch responded by saying: "Nothing's happening at Fox News". TNT's NBA-playoff heavy schedule finished second, averaging 1.8 million viewers between 8-11 p.m. MSNBC, HGTV and ESPN round out the top five. A spokeswoman for The Sun's parent company - part of Murdoch's News Corp - said MacKenzie remains suspended, but declined further comment.


For Fox, the situation is all too reminiscent of Britain's phone-hacking scandal, in which journalists working for Murdoch newspapers were accused of gaining illegal access to the voicemail messages of celebrities, members of the royal family and crime victims. The scandal revealed close ties between politicians, police and the employees of the paper.

The trouble for the company is that, on Thursday, Wigdor is going to spend rather a long time in the inner sanctum of Ofcom providing the kind of detail that can not be good news for the Murdochs' latest bid.

The BBC asked Murdoch if he was concerned about the Ofcom review as he left his offices in NY on Monday. She says the bid for Sky should be blocked because media companies have a special role in society.

"The company's management has taken prompt and decisive action to address reports of sexual harassment and workplace issues at Fox News". Bill Shine, a longtime deputy for Ailes who was promoted to co-president of Fox News in August, was also forced to leave due to the perception that he did little to deter inappropriate behavior within the company.

Asked by the BBC yesterday about the Fox News situation, Murdoch himself responded, "Fox News is getting record ratings, and so I'm not anxious at all". The two bodies are analysing whether media baron Rupert Murdoch's takeover of Sky would give him too much control of United Kingdom news media and whether or not he is a "fit and proper" owner.

With approval of the deal expected next month, a lead attorney for several current and former Fox News employees is urging British regulators to consider what he describes as the network's pattern of gender and racial discrimination, harassment and retaliation.

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