2017 supermoon rises this weekend

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"Nearby perigee full moons appear about 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than full moons that occur near apogee in the moon's orbit".

The moon will be roughly 10,000 miles closer to Earth on Sunday evening, creating our first and only Supermoon of the year. The supermoon will reach its perigee -the closest point in its orbit around the Earth - at 3:45 a.m. the following day.

The final supermoon of 2017 will be visible in the night sky this weekend.

According to Michael Nicholas, Public Observer Director of Chicago's Adler Planetarium, the moon will cope a distance of 222,135km from the ground today.

When's the best time to view the supermoon?


This year's will occur Sunday, Dec. 3. But the supermoon that took place exactly a month before that was much more notable - it was the closest supermoon to Earth since January 1948.

The supermoon tends to be brighter and appear to be larger than its usual size. This makes the full moon appear even larger and luminous due to its increased proximity to the planet.

"The supermoons are a great opportunity for people to start looking at the Moon, not just that once but every chance they have!" says Noah Petro, a research scientist from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. In fact, the supermoon slated for January 31, 2018, will be both, making it a Super Blue Moon.

If you're clouded out on Sunday, you can still get into the supermoon spirit on Sunday with streaming video from the Virtual Telescope Project or the Slooh online observatory. When two full moons occur in the same month, the second is sometimes called a blue moon or, in this case, a super blue moon.

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