Counterprotesters expected to drastically outnumber white supremacists in DC

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President Donald Trump was roundly condemned previous year for saying there was "blame on both sides" for the violence, condemning the anti-fascists who came "with clubs in their hands".

Demonstrators carry banners on the campus of the University of Virginia during a rally for the anniversary of last year's Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Aug. 11, 2018.

He called for the nation to "come together" after a week in which he stoked racial divisions with attacks on black athletes and other minorities.

"I condemn all types of racism and acts of violence", Trump wrote.

Counter-protesters turned out to demonstrate against the rally.

Trump ignited one of the biggest firestorms of criticism of his presidency over his response to the violent "Unite the Right" rally, in which he drew a moral equivalence between the white supremacists and neo-Nazis that descended on the college town and those who protested against them.

Anadolu Agency via Getty Images Peter Cvjetanovic, right, appears with neo-Nazis, alt-right supporters and white nationalists holding tiki torches and chanting at counterprotesters in Virginia on August 11, 2017.

Trump insulted the intelligence of National Basketball Association star LeBron James and CNN anchor Don Lemon, both of whom are black, reignited his crusade against black football players protesting against police brutality and told a group of business leaders that Chinese students studying in the United States were spies.

Tensions had been building throughout the Unite the Right rally protest where white supremacists and white nationalists defended on the city. On Wednesday, gov Ralph Northam and the city both declared states of emergency, citing the "potential impacts of events" in Charlottesville during the anniversary weekend.

In addition, two police officers died in a helicopter crash while they were monitoring the protests.


With Charlottesville police widely criticized for their handling of last year's rally, D.C. authorities are vowing to prevent violence.

The first Unite the Right rally was held on August 12, 2017. A Politico-Morning Consult poll found that "55 percent of voters say race relations have worsened under Trump, compared with 16 percent who say they have gotten better".

The most intense moments occurred in the evening at the University of Virginia campus at the "Rally for Justice", where a group of some 200 Antifa activists shouted at riot police lines, "Black Lives Matter!" and "No Nazis, No KKK, No Fascist USA!".

But some 115 miles (185 kilometers) away in Washington, the principal organizer of last year's "Unite the Right" event was scheduled to hold a so-called white civil rights rally, and police were preparing for crowds of counterprotesters.

"I'm not looking forward to what that's going to look like this weekend", she said.

'If you rush to heal, if you rush to everybody grab each other and sing kumbaya, we will be back here in a few years, ' she said.

"Out of the bars into the streets", they chanted.

Later, he again blamed "both sides".

"'All types.' 'Both sides.' Continuing to advance a narrative of moral equivalency between racists and those opposed to racism, so as not to tick of his white supremacist supporters", Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP's Legal Defense and Educational Fund, posted on Twitter.

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