Senate Democrats demand 100,000 withheld Kavanaugh records

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Trump nominated Kavanaugh in June to succeed Justice Anthony Kennedy, who was the Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States until he retired this year. Add Supreme Court as an interest to stay up to date on the latest Supreme Court news, video, and analysis from ABC News.

But the letter said that the White House and the Department of Justice, conducting its own review of the presidential records, "have identified certain documents of the type traditionally protected by constitutional privilege". President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, officiates at the swearing-in of Judge Britt Grant to take a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit in Atlanta at the U.S. District Courthouse in Washington.

She aired similar concerns about "148,000 documents that I've seen that you cannot see because they will not allow us to make them public so I can't even tell you about them right now on this show", referring to additional material that only members of the Senate Judiciary Committee are being allowed to view.

"We're witnessing a Friday night document massacre", Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer wrote on Twitter on Saturday, a nod to Richard Nixon's 1973 "Saturday Night Massacre" during the Watergate scandal. Republicans have not requested documents from Kavanaugh's time as staff secretary and have only requested papers from when Kavanaugh worked as a White House lawyer.

According to the letter, most of those documents withheld are about "deliberations and candid advice concerning the selection and nomination of judicial candidates, the confidentiality of which is critical to any president's ability to carry out this core executive function".


The Department of Justice and the White House said it had identified the documents to be within "constitutional privilege", Burck wrote in the letter, which was released by the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Schumer called the "last moment" decision by President Trump "unprecedented in the history of [Supreme Court nominations]" and said it had "all the makings of a cover up". In a release, the committee pointed out that Grassley had promised to facilitate the release of another set of documents, now available only to members, if senators keep their requests targeted to specific documents. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) said of the White House.

"If we just walked out, it would simply be one side asking the questions", Klobuchar told NBC's "Meet the Press".

Republicans said Democrats are reaching for objections.

"I think it's much more powerful if we go in there and ask the questions".

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